Liz Writes Life 11-21-17

November 21, 2017

Liz Writes Life

Last week, I failed to mention that the parsley had grown back and was still green, even though there had been several frosts. I have never harvested parsley in November, but decided it should be saved for cooking. After cutting it, I realized it wasn’t going to dry very well in a paper bag. The extra bedroom is cold this time of year, not hot like in the summer.

So, I turned on the oven to 225 degrees, put the parsley on a cookie sheet and placed it in the oven and turned the oven off. I have learned you don’t want to over-heat it. I left it there for several hours and then did it again. It came out a nice green, crunchy dry and filled a quart jar about two-thirds full.

Preparedness

My 72-hour bag was where I thought it was, but there were not as many items in it as I thought. Guess it has been ransacked a few times! Even the small peanut butter jar was missing, but there was a towel, two hand-towels and a wash cloth that I forgot about. Also, I found the shake-for-two-minutes flashlight for light!

Tip: In looking for solar powered camping lights on the internet, I found one that can be either a stand-up lantern or folds into a flashlight. In fact, I was shocked at how much cheaper solar powered emergency lights and cell phone battery chargers are now. Three years ago, I purchased a one-bulb-hanging-light powered by a tiny bank of solar panels for $50. Now, you can get one for $12 to $20. I guess I’ll keep the shake flashlight, but will be looking for a solar one very soon. I checked the one I purchased three years ago and the light still worked and I haven’t charged it once. Wow, that is impressive!

I would like to get a solar battery charger for my cell phone and put it in my car’s glove compartment. Sometimes, I leave home without my phone fully charged. Guess you could plug in your cell phone and put the solar charger in the back window – well if it is daylight and not too dingy of winter weather – and it could save the day, without it being a real emergency. They run under $20.

Smart meters

Apparently it has already started in Mt. Shasta area. Pacific Power is moving forward with its program to replace our analog meters with a Radio Frequency (RF) meter. These meters are wireless, digital and contain a RF chip that allows the power company to read and control your energy use – remotely. Yep, very scary.

These new meters can record and store data of how much you use your new micro-chipped washing machine, hair dryers, TV, etc.; and are devices violating federal and state wiretapping laws. Wow!

Of course smart meters are controversial. Groups have compiled information showing health problems from this radio frequency. Another negative is the fact that when monitoring your usage, Pacific Power will then be able to charge you more for using more energy during high-peak time periods. Yep, that is my major complaint.

According to the Federal Energy Policy Act of 2005, utilities had to “offer” the new RF meters “upon customer’s request,” but now Pacific Power has mandated the new meters be installed. I claim this is over-stepping their authority.

Unfortunately, Pacific Power, like other utilities, is demanding a “fee” to opt-out, although the above mentioned Policy Act states customers can opt-out I would think for free. Currently, my spies tell me the fee is $75 and then a $20 or $10 a month cost. This looks like extortion to me. But it may still be cheaper than your rates increasing, because this Big Brother is watching.

You can say NO, but there is a process. First you must have an official notice signed and dated by you on your old meter. Laminate it to withstand the weather. You can get one of these for $1 at the next Scott Valley Protect Our Water meeting on Wed., Nov. 29, 2017 at the Fort Jones Community Center at 7 p.m. Or stop in at Siskiyou Laser, on Broadway in Yreka.

Then a letter for “Opting Out” must be sent to Pacific Power. Be sure to send it “registered” through your local post office, so that Pacific Power will have to acknowledge you sent it. Also make a copy for your files.

Here is a template letter, it is also on LizBowen.com:

Date

Stephan Bird, CEO Pacific Power                                                                                                                                                                                                 825 NE Multnomah Street
Portland, OR 97232

NOTICE OF NON-CONSENT TO INSTALL A MICROWAVE TRANSMITTER, (SMART METER) ON RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY, NOTICE OF LIABILITY

Dear Mr. Bird, officers, employees, contractors and interested parties:

The installation of any RF meter that transmits or emits microwave radiation on the residential property located at (your residence address) is hereby refused and prohibited.   On Feb. 9, 2012 the California Public Utility Commission ruled that the utility companies will have to honor the request of those who wanted to “opt out” of having a RF meter installed on their property.

While my reasons include health and privacy, I would expect my request to be honored without a stated reason.

If you refuse my request and place a RF meter on at my residence, I will have no choice but to promptly remove the meter myself and restore the analog meter.

Thank you for respecting my request.

Your signature and address, including you residence.

Remember, if you do nothing these RF meters will be installed on your home, business or other buildings like your pump houses. I assume pump usage for your well water will then be scrutinized and rates possibly increased by Pacific Power.

I don’t want to sound like Chicken Little, so please look into RF smart meters yourself.

Liz Bowen is a native of Siskiyou County and lives near Callahan. Check out her website Liz Bowen.com or call her at 530-467-3515.

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